Collapsing star mysteriously reborn as black hole, reveal NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer images

Collapsing star mysteriously reborn as black hole, reveal NASA's Hubble and Spitzer imagesCollapsing star mysteriously reborn as black hole, reveal NASA's Hubble and Spitzer images

Collapsing star mysteriously reborn as black hole, reveal NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer images

New Delhi: A team of astronomers says that a massive star and death have been reborn as a black hole.

The observation was made using images from the large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes.
“Massive flaws” of this type in a nearby galaxy could explain why astronomers rarely see supernovae from the most massive stars, said Christopher Kochanek, a professor of astronomy at Ohio State University and Ohio’s eminent scholar in observational cosmology .

NASA says the star, which was 25 times more massive than our Sun, would have exploded in a bright supernova. Instead, he collapsed – and went behind a black hole.

Up to 30 percent of these stars, it seems, can collapse into black holes – no supernova is required.

“The typical view is that a star can form a black hole after the supernova,” Kochanek said. “If a star can not exceed a supernova and still make a black hole, that would help explain why we do not see supernovae from the most massive stars.”

NGC 6946, a spiral galaxy 22 million light-years away, which is nicknamed “Galaxy Fireworks” because supernova occur frequently there – 2017eaw SN, discovered May 14 shines almost to maximum brightness now – between galaxies in the directed computer By Kochanek looked.

As of 2009, special star, called N6946-BH1, began to brighten up a bit. By 2015, it appeared to have made a nod, according to the NASA statement.

Once LBT research did not supernovae the star rose, astronomers called Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to see if it was still there, but simply mitigated. They also used the Spitzer to look for any infrared radiation from the spot. This would have been a sign that the star was still present, but perhaps only concealed behind a cloud of dust.

All the tests are negative and the star is gone. By a careful removal process, the researchers ultimately concluded that the star had turned into a black hole.

Scott Adams, a former Ohio State student who recently received his doctorate in the framework of this work, was able to make a preliminary estimate, although it is too early in the project to know for sure how many both stars are experiencing massive failures.

“N6946-BH1 is the only supernova probably not found in the first seven years of our research. During this period, six normal supernovae have occurred in the galaxies we monitor, suggesting that 10 to 30% of stars die As massive supernovas failed, “he said.

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