Astroboffins spot a new type of galaxy bursting with stars

Astroboffins spot a new type of galaxy bursting with starsAstroboffins spot a new type of galaxy bursting with stars

Astroboffins spot a new type of galaxy bursting with stars

A team of astronomers stumbled upon a new type of galaxy that could be the missing piece in the puzzle of how ancient galaxies grew to such huge dimensions.

There is a strange population of galaxies that formed when the universe was less than 2 billion years old compared to the current estimated age of about 14 billion. These galaxies are surprisingly heavy and full of gas cocktail swirls and stars.

Some scientists believe they have to be from a group of hyperactive precursor galaxies that have led the star to exceptionally fast formation rates. But these types of galaxies have not been found so far.

The team described the discovery as “serious.” Development rates of the star around the quasars during the discovery were analyzed.

The quasars are very energetic and brilliant. The widespread view is that its energy comes from supermassive black holes in the center of nearby galaxies by pulling the surrounding material.

“But what they found in four separate cases were nearby galaxies that form stars at a dizzying pace, producing about a hundred solar masses of new stars per year,” said Roberto Decarli, lead author of the article published in Nature and researcher at The Max Planck Institute for Astronomy.

These galaxies are pumping stars a hundred times faster than the Milky Way. It is probably a coincidence that they were seen close to the quasars, according to Fabian Walter, co-author of the article and researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy.

“It is believed that Quasares to form in regions of the universe in which the density of matter on a large scale is much higher than the average.The same conditions should also favor galaxies form new stars at a much higher rate,” He explained.

They are promising candidates to explain how old galaxies with large redshifts have risen to a high altitude, but additional studies are needed to reconstruct these two.

“What fast-growing galaxies we’ve discovered are in fact the precursors to massive galaxies first seen a few years later, it takes more work to see just how common they are,” said Eduardo Bains, coauthor of the article and researcher at the Carnegie Institution for Science.

 

Be the first to comment

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*